Secondary Containment Products

Our secondary containment products include our Ready spill berms, pit liners, tank containment berms, and more. Additionally, we manufacture a complete line of flexible fuel and water bladders. Call us now to discuss your secondary containment needs.

The Spill Prevention, Control, and Countermeasure (SPCC) rule enacted by the Environmental Protection Agency to help facilities prevent spills into navigable waters and adjoining shorelines. Facilities that must comply with this rule are required to develop and implement an SPCC Plan. What is your SPCC Plan? If you don’t have one, find more information on the EPA SPCC Plan, and get one for your facility.

Secondary Containment
Secondary Containment

What is Secondary Containment?  Q & A

Secondary containment is defined as a means of surrounding one or more primary storage containers to collect any hazardous material spillage in the event of loss of integrity or container failure.

How big must a secondary containment structure be around a tank farm to be effective?

The secondary containment system “must have sufficient capacity to contain at least 10% of the total volume of the primary containers, or 100% of the volume of the largest container, whichever is greater.”

As an example, if a delivery truck with a 100-gallon diesel fuel tank delivers fuel to your facility, is SPCC applicable to it, particularly the secondary containment requirement, or is it covered under 40 CFR 112, Appendix B, the MOU with DOT and DOI?

As long as the vehicle is in “transportation mode” (it has papers and it’s stopping at your facility for delivery only and not, for example, overnight), then you are not responsible for the fuel that is powering the vehicle and are most likely exempt from SPCC. But you are responsible for the fuel being transferred to your tank. However, in terms of the tank powering the delivery truck, it is also a good idea to err on the side of caution. When regulators say you are most likely exempt, they are leaving themselves some wiggle room. Obviously, if you see that tank leaking, you should do something about it.

Our containment products are second to none! The images below are just a sample of the containment products we make. We manufacture spill berms, fuel bladders, water bladders, containment liners, pit liners, and tank liners in a variety of shapes and sizes. Our number one selling berm is our Ready Berm, built for most secondary containment needs. In fact, the Ready Spill Berm is designed to be lightweight, rapid deploying, and portable, while some of our other spill containment products are designed to save floor space, storage space, or to provide drive-thru spill containment. 

Secondary Containment?

Secondary spill containment is the containment of hazardous liquids to prevent the pollution of soil and water. Conventional techniques include the use of spill berms to contain oil-filled equipment, fuel tanks, truck washing decks, or any other places or items that may leak hazardous liquids.

Containment for Hazardous Materials Storage Guidelines

In fact, secondary containment is a means of surrounding one or more primary storage containers to collect any hazardous material spillage in the event of loss of integrity or container failure. Hazardous materials must be stored in secondary containers to prevent or minimize the possibility of accidental release, as well as to ensure compliance with specific local, state, and federal regulations dealing with chemical storage. Hazardous materials include, but are not limited to, chemicals, hazardous waste, and oil-filled equipment. Please refer to the secondary containment flow chart below for assistance in determining if secondary containment is required in your facility.

Secondary Containment Guide

Is secondary containment required?

The above chart is just a guide. Please check with a local expert as local needs may vary.

secondary containment berm

You name it! We contain it.

Liquids, vapors, and more.

We are the leaders in flexible secondary containment.

What is Secondary Containment?

Secondary spill containment is the containment of liquids in order to prevent the pollution of soil and water. Our techniques include the use of spill berms to contain fluid-filled equipment, like fuel tanks, frac-tanks, chemical tanks, 55-gallon drums, truck-washing decks, or any other places or items that may leak hazardous liquids.

Hazardous Materials Storage Guidelines

Secondary containment is a means of surrounding one or more primary storage containers to collect any hazardous material spillage in the event of loss of integrity or container failure. Hazardous materials must be stored in secondary containers to prevent or minimize the possibility of accidental release, as well as to ensure compliance with specific local, state, and federal regulations dealing with chemical storage. Hazardous materials include, but are not limited to, chemicals, hazardous waste, and oil-filled equipment. Please refer to the secondary containment flow chart below for assistance in determining if secondary containment is required.

EPA Secondary Containment Regulations Made Easy By Ready Containment, LLC.

At Ready Containment, we know how confusing regulations can be. To make it easier for you, below, we broke down the five main areas to consider under the EPA’s hazardous waste storage regulation 40 CFR 264.175, “The Secondary Containment Regulations”.

  1. A secondary containment system must be liquid-tight and free of cracks or gaps.

The first thing to realize is that periodic inspection is required. Carefully inspect your containment system to ensure there is no damage on a regular basis (put it on your reminders). Note any damage that could prevent the containment system from performing its intended purpose: which is to provide secondary containment for the contained liquids in case the primary storage fails. Additionally, be sure that the containment system is chemically compatible with whatever liquids could come into contact with the containment. Your containment system won’t be effective if the liquids it’s supposed to hold are incompatible

  1. The primary container can’t sit in waste, so the secondary containment unit must be designed with a sump in order to easily remove spilled or leaking liquid.

You can raise your containers on grates, decking, or wood pallets (remember, anything in the secondary containment must be compatible and not cause a hazardous reaction). Furthermore, a drain can be installed to your secondary containment unit or spill berm, allowing for easy pumping or draining of the liquids out of the containment. The drain is especially helpful in outdoor applications to remove rainwater from the sump area. Remember, the sump capacity is the amount of liquid that can be contained in the secondary containment. Also note that spill berm capacities indicated by Ready Containment, LLC website are on a level surface, so please allow for any slope.

  1. The secondary containment system “must have sufficient capacity to contain at least 110% of the volume of the largest container or 10% of the total volume of the primary containers, whichever is greater.”
  • i.e.: You are storing two 55-gallon drums. So you have a total volume of 110 gallons.
  • 10% of the total of all the containers (two 55-gallon drums) is 11 gallons. (10% of 110 gallons)
  • 110% of the largest container stored is 60.5 gallons.
  • 60.5 gallons is greater than 11 gallons, so you would need to have secondary containment for 60.5 gallons. Additionally, allow for any slope the secondary containment is sitting on.

Above are just the federal containment regulations. All states and municipalities have to follow these regulations, but many local authorities have stricter regulations. Always check with your state and local municipality on their secondary containment regulations. We recommend working with a qualified environmental engineer

  1. Rainwater must be prevented from collecting in the secondary containment system unless the system has enough capacity to contain any run-on in addition to the volume capacity requirements.

Yes, you also have to worry about rainwater. When your containment unit is outdoors, any rainwater, snowmelt, or other liquid that enters the sump of the secondary containment unit will take up capacity in the containment system. In the event of a spill, the additional fluid could cause an overflow of the containment. Regulators are serious about this one. A simple solution is to put your containment system under shelter or a self-contained cover. Of course, with some larger systems, this may be impossible. If that’s your situation, consider the worst storm your area has had in the last 100 years (NOAA has data on this if your memory isn’t quite that good) and calculate that into your capacity requirements.

  1. Any spills or rainwater that have spilled or leaked into the secondary containment area must be removed in as timely a manner as is necessary to prevent overflow.

So remember — inspect it and clean it up if needed. Any liquids in the sump reduce the sump capacity. You already know that it is a big problem if you have a spill. The displaced volume could cause your system to overflow in the event of a release from the primary container. Remember to routinely inspect your sump and containment system for cracks, leaks, and unwanted liquids. Any liquids will need to be cleaned up ASAP.

Secondary Containment Berm

The Ready Berm – No Assembly Required

Spill Containment Berms

Ready Drive Through Berm – Allows for easy in and out

Foam wall spill berms

Ready Foam Wall Berm – Secondary Containment Berm

Secondary Containment Berms

When considering secondary containment, Ready’s containment berms are second to none. We never use mechanical fasteners, such as rivets or ropes, when manufacturing spill containment berms as these parts are not a chemical or weather-resistant way to seal closed the corners of our spill containment berms. Additionally, we also construct our products with 3″ overlap welds, reinforced corners, and sealed, reinforced support sleeves, and to prevent leaks as well as increase durability, our support brackets are no more than 18″ on center.

Many of our competitors cut corners and costs by using inferior fabrics, drains, or support systems that won’t hold the liquid load. Our spill containment products are built using only the best grade “A” fabrics, Viton gaskets, and aircraft-grade aluminum supports, making our spill berms more durable, more flexible, and longer-lasting.

We invite you to our factory to see how we’ve become the leaders in spill berms and bladders.

In addition to manufacturing spill berms and liners, we also fabricate fuel, vapor and water bladders. Ready Containment’s products provide both secondary containment and primary containment. Our secondary containment products are built to help to protect the environment from pollutants and other toxins. Call us to see how we can help.

Secondary Containment liner
Secondary Containment liner

Containment White Papers:

Foam wall berm PDF
Ready-L-Bracket-Berm
Military Bladder Tanks PDF
Ready Spill Berm PDF

Secondary Containment FAQ:

If, after reviewing the information below, you have a question that we haven’t answered, contact us, and we’ll be happy to help!

Question: How do I determine what size secondary containment to order?

Determine the size and capacity.

  1. Answer: Determine the dimensions of the containment needed based on the amount of liquid that needs secondary containment by measuring the length and width of the container or equipment you wish to contain and add  1-2 feet to the berm’s length and width. This will allow for clearance to work or drive into the area.
  2. Answer: Determine the capacity of the berm and ensure that this will contain the total volume of liquid in the container or equipment. Also, don’t forget to allow for displacement and allow for a 110% containment. Find out more about the EPA specifications at http://www.epa.gov/oilspill/spcc.htm.

Question: What fabric is used by Ready Containment to build its secondary containment products?

  1. Answer: It depends on what is being contained. Basically, we use whichever fabric is chemically compatible.
  2. Answer: Ready Containment secondary containment is typically constructed using a 30 oz. chemical resistant ER-1000, XR-5, or equivalent fabric. We also offer other specialty fabric for acids and other applications. 

Question: Do I need to prep the area for the secondary containment?

  1. Answer:  We recommend a level surface, cleared of any rocks, nails, or other objects that may puncture the berm. We offer ground mats to protect the berm from damage from underneath and track mats to protect the spill berm from rocks and other objects that may be in the tires of the trucks.
  2. Answer: Keep in mind that if you set the spill containment berm up on an un-level surface, you will lose capacity.

Question: Can the secondary containment liner be repaired?

Answer: Yes, As part of our *7 Year warranty on our 30 oz. ER-1000, XR-5 8130, or equivalent fabric spill containment. We offer the use of a professional hot air welder to allow in-field repairs.

Question: Can the secondary containment liner and berm be customized?

Answer: Yes, with an ISO 9001;2015 certified design QMS, we can customize a one-up solution for your spill containment issue or help to design, build, and produce your spill containment solution.

If you have any additional questions, please call us at 941-739-9486.